Ht600 Battery - Recycle - Into something else !

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zzpot
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Ht600 Battery - Recycle - Into something else !

Post by zzpot »

Hlo ppl

Lets make something !

I have a few of the dead ht600 batterys laying around that I would like to make into something else.

One thing comes to mind is a bench power supply adaptor for testing and tunning without using a battery.

The other thing comes to mind is the Battery Eliminator......that plugs into you vehicle cigarette lighter.

So the question is how do we convert the 12vdc down to 10vdc in the plumbing trade we would call this a reducer.

Also as far as a bench power supply I was looking at the bottom of a rapid charge and its pumping out 22vdc at 1.1 amps. So could I hollow out a dead battery build something to convert it down to the 10vdc and use this for testing and tuning radios ?


As always your input if valued

zz
firegood
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Post by firegood »

i bulit one using an voltage regulator from 12 to 10 at one amp. works good as a backup when your battery dies.
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kb0nly
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Post by kb0nly »

I've built quite a few now for HT600's and MT1000's, but don't put it in the rapid charger to do so. The rapid charger can supply up to 22v and it will keep pumping in more and more voltage watching for an increase in the battery floating voltage, hence the battery is taking a charge. Now if you put a battery eliminator in there with a regulator the charger will just run at it's max output and the regulator will have work harder to reduce the voltage to a steady 10v.

I already played around with it, so trust me on that! Got that charger and regulator mighty warm!

Your better off just building one to run off any old 13.8v supply, or a cigarette lighter plug, etc. All you need is a 10v regulator and a diode across the input to provide reverse polarity protection, along with a fuse on the input. I use a L78S10CV 10v regulator from Mouser.com, costs a whopping $.46. And a 1N6277A diode across the input, stripe (cathode) to positive and the other side to ground. The way this works is the diode does not conduct when the proper polarity is observed, but when you accidently reverse the polarity the diode conducts and the fuse pops! Use a 3amp fuse. The regulator is rated for 2.0amps which is enough to run the HT600 or MT1000 on transmit.

The best way to get them open is just cut around the bottom of the battery about a 1/4inch in from the end, then remove the cut off end and gut out the cells and power flex. Just leave the piece of flex and the top battery contacts up in the top end and solder your supply leads from the regulator directly to the underside of the top battery contacts. Route the supply wiring out through the charging contact holes, weave the wire through them to form a strain relief for the wiring.

Then you can glue the bottom back on or whatever way you want to. I use a couple small pieces of aluminum bent into 90 degree brackets and use a self tapping screw through the side and a countersunk screw through the bottom, this way the radio can still stand on the eliminator. I don't like some of the aftermarket ones with the power wiring exiting the bottom, because then the radio can't stand up while on it.
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zzpot
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Post by zzpot »

Hlo kbOnly

Hey thanks for that tip on running it out the side because it was sure coming out the bottom on the first prototype....lol

Jotted those numbers down gone to run down to radio shack and see if i can get some stupid looks from the ppl that work there.

If not its off to the local ham shop in the morning.

Say just cut the base off so it can be inserted back on ?

Ok thanks for the help !!!


zz
wazzzzzzzzup
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Post by wazzzzzzzzup »

i have dabbled in cutting up batteries, i found a good tool for cutting batteries open is a dremel with a cut off wheel on it, you may go thru a couple of wheels for a 600 bat but the cut is relatively clean if you dont cut too hard, if you cut hard you will melt alot of plastic

wazz
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firegood
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Post by firegood »

band saw if you have one, you can use that line right below the charge contacts, and just shove the blade in there.
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kb0nly
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Post by kb0nly »

Yep, follow that line if nothing else. I use a dremel with a cut off wheel set to the lowest speed, helps prevent some of the melting. But if your making an eliminator you don't have to worry about the case being slightly shorter due to the cut, now if you were going to try and replace the cells thats a whole different story, and not worth it either since these batteries are available rather cheap now.
Duct tape is like the force, it has a dark side and a light side and it holds the universe together.

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mancow
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Post by mancow »

I don't think they carry any high current regulators at RadioShack. I had to order mine from DigiKey.
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zzpot
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Post by zzpot »

Hey Guys

Thanks for the tips on those online suppliers.....

http://www.Mouser.com

http://www.digikey.com


Looks like they carry or have alot of goodies.


Let me ask the group something else.......has anyone heard of the Cold Heat Soildering gun.......and has anyone used one ?


Ok....thanks again
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wavetar
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Post by wavetar »

zzpot wrote:
Let me ask the group something else.......has anyone heard of the Cold Heat Soildering gun.......and has anyone used one ?


Ok....thanks again
Complete crap...don't bother with it at all. One of our field techs picked one up a few months ago. He used it for about a day before deciding it was next to useless & brought it back.

Anything that has the "as seen on TV" label is generally garbage.

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kb0nly
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Post by kb0nly »

The Cold Heat is a joke. Not to mention that you can't use it on any sensitive devices because it puts a sensing voltage on the tip, you can even see a slight spark or arc on them at the tip after some use.

I tried one, it worked ok for a while for just around the house soldering this or that, fixed some phone wires with it, but then it became unreliable, you would have to fiddle around with it to get it to heat up, it eats batteries like crazy too. If you have more than a couple small wires to solder have some extra batteries in your pocket!

For my money, a butane powered soldering iron is the way to go if you need something portable. You can buy a Weller butane powered unit at Wal-Mart here for $30 with the full tip kit, it has a nice pointed soldering tip, a hot air tip for working with heat shrink tubing that includes a deflector so it does the whole circumference at once, and a torch tip which is THE tool for those big ring terminals and battery lugs.

Cans of butane run around a buck or two depending on where you go. I keep one in my toolbox just for those "gotta fix it now" situations. But it's just as reliable for using on the work bench if the power goes out, or if i need a little extra heat for a large terminal, etc. They also make different size chisel tips for them as well.

Now if you want a good reliable soldering station, go with Hakko/Atten, i wouldn't give up my Hakko 936 for anything. Quick heat up, fast recovery, and a huge selection of tips, wands, heater elements, etc. I used to use the Hakko at a previous employer, that's when i fell in love with it. Now if i can only afford the Hakko 470 series desoldering station, it has a built in vacuum pump, push of the trigger and your desoldering! I have been trying to snag one on the used market, after using it daily for that previous employer i want one at home!
Duct tape is like the force, it has a dark side and a light side and it holds the universe together.

"I Reject Your Reality And Substitute My Own!" - Adam Savage
Charlied
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Post by Charlied »

Hacksaw with a metal cutting blade makes quick and neat work of a battery.
Just follow the lines on the motorola battery.
KI4ISE
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